Architecture

Interiors: A Gorgeous Vacation Rental in the South of France

I’ve got my travel bug back, which means I’m dreaming and scheming, and coming across so many incredible places to stay. Wow. Jaw dropping interiors! Here’s a peek into a modern and elegant home in the South of France.

Apartment Georges Brassens, HĂ©rault, France

All photos via Hometown France.

Interiors: Spaces I’d Like To See More Of

Two interiors I’d like to see more of are:

  1. Suzanne Dimma‘s recently overhauled home in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.
Casa Louise by Suzanne Dimma

2. Leanne Ford‘s all-white spaces everywhere!

Leanne Ford’s attic featured in Clever – Architectural Digest
Leanne Ford’s attic featured in Clever – Architectural Digest
yoga studio by Leanne Ford
farmhouse project by Leanne Ford
Paris project by Leanne Ford

Design: Georgia O’Keeffe’s New Mexico Kitchen

I watched this video about the evolution of kitchen design from architect John Ota, and I found it fascinating. If you like history, design, and food, I think you’ll like it, too.

Here are some images of Georgia O’Keefe’s kitchen in New Mexico. I enjoy the simplicity of this white, airy, organized kitchen.

John Ota is the author of The Kitchen, a book that celebrates the kitchen (aka the heart of the home). I’ve just requested it at from my library, and I look forward to reading it.

Source of all images: Evolution of the Kitchen with John Ota.

Interiors: Beauty Restored in Kingston, New York

I have been following Daniel Kanter (Manhattan Nest) for years. Seven years ago, he bought a dilapidated old home (with so much potential) in Kingston, New York, and he has been renovating it ever since. Recently, he has taken his readers down memory lane, and it has been wonderful to see the results of his effort to make his home beautiful. I appreciate his design aesthetic and how he has maintained the charm of historic home while injecting it with some modernity.

Photos by Daniel Kanter (living room, hallway).

Design: Two Peaceful White Homes

I crave calm after busy days full of work and social time (in both pandemic and non-pandemic times). This is one of the reasons why I live in a white home. The white walls, art, decor, and furniture make me feel happy and calm. Yes, I do have colour around my home, but for the most part, I live in quite a white space.

The owners and designers of these two homes – one in the country and one in the city – seem to feel the same what that I do about the beauty and peacefulness of white spaces.

Beach House Muskoka

Beach House Muskoka

Montreal Apartment

Azamit‘s Montreal apartment featured on House & Home; photos by Andrew Hadley

Interiors: White and Bright in California

I know my posts have been sporadic these last few months, but I think my creative juices are slowly coming back, and I feel like writing more regularly again.

I’ve had this California home saved for a while to share, so here it is. The view from the large living room window is spectacular, and I could imagine so many lovely meals at the dining room table. Wouldn’t it be ideal if the table was always set as it is in the photo?

The low-rise bed in the main bedroom is waiting for someone to jump on it, I think. And the the twin room is sweet and cozy.

All photos via Remodelista. Photography by Tessa Neustadt. Design by Jenni Kayne.

Design: Cozy White Cabins

We got hit with an awful freezing rain and snow storm yesterday, which meant that it was the perfect day to decorate my home for Christmas, drink multiple cups of tea, and take a nap by the fireplace. It was a good day.

The dreary day also had me down an internet rabbit hole of cozy, white cabins. I’m a cottage person more than a cabin person, but you wouldn’t have to twist my arm to stay under soft blankets and reading all day if I had a gorgeous mountain cabin of my own!

There are several elements that these spaces share: warm white tones, textured fabrics, wood accents, and fireplaces.

Brent Darby, The Daily Mail
Swiss chalet, Art de Vivre
photo by Femina, via Domino

What would be your must-haves in a cabin of your own?

#WhiteCabanaWearsPink: Little Pink Houses

As you may remember, pink takes over some of the pages of White Cabana this month in my #WhiteCabanaWearsPink series. It’s one way that I can raise awareness and funds for breast cancer research. Last weekend, I ran 5K (I ran! The whole 5K! I surprised myself, to be honest, as it’s been a really long while since I’ve run!), and I dressed in head-to-toe pink (as did just about everyone else in the run. It’s always an emotional day, and I’m so thankful for my family and friends who supported me and donated generously. Thank you.

Today, I’m bringing pink to the blog in one of my favourite ways – architecture. These pink homes and buildings are from all around the world, and I can imagine how many people walk in and out of these beautiful buildings each day to gather, laugh, share stories, eat, and support causes that are important to them.

Singapore, Hello Sandwich
Buffalo, NY, Tiffany Pratt
Martha’s Vineyard, Elizabeth Anne Designs
Nova Scotia, Sarah Gunn
Poznan, Poland, En Touriste
Venice, Italy, The Slow Traveler

Art: Katerina Kamprani

Architect Katerina Kamprani designs useless everyday objects in her series The Uncomfortable. Each piece put a smile on my face. The collection made me think about how much thought goes into product design so that the things we use everyday are functional.

As Katerina says on her site, these products are “deliberately designed to annoy you.” True!

All photos from The Uncomfortable series by Katerina Kamprani.

Design: Chateau Lafaurie-Peyraguey, France

Let’s go to France today. More specifically, let’s travel to the Chateau Lafaurie-Peyraguey hotel which is not only part of the Relais & Chateaux group, but is also a Lalique hotel (as in the famous French crystal company). This combo means that the Chateau has the best-of-the-best of decor, food, and services.

Who is ready to book a flight to Bordeaux to discover this gorgeous property?

Interiors: The White Kitchen

Have you seen an increase in dark kitchens floating around design sites and magazines? I’ve been seeing hunter green and black more than usual along with an increase in shades of blue on walls and cabinetry. While I do appreciate the moodier aesthetic, I think a white kitchen is the way to go (no surprise, right)? Just look at the kitchens here – they’re bright, clean, and inviting. Food looks great on white dishware…and it also looks perfect in white kitchens!

The first few kitchens below were part of the One Room Challenge Spring 2019 event, so I encourage you to click through to see the before photos of these spaces.

Gerstner Architects via One Kind Design (and that staircase!)

What are your thoughts about kitchen colours? Are you a fan of white, colour, or natural wood?

Architecture: Japan in White

I can see why people adore Japan. I fall in that boat now, too. One of the things that caught my attention was the architecture. Across the five major cities I visited while I was there, the architecture continued to impress me. It was varied within cities and across cities. There were centuries old castles and temples and modern office buildings that made me stop and stare. Here are ten white (or white-ish) buildings that caught my eye.

The Seiko building at Ginza Crossing, Tokyo
hotel in Tokyo
office building, Tokyo (stairs are often on the outside like this)
Ginza Place office building, Tokyo (architects: Klein Dytham Architecture, Taisei Design Planners Architects)
Science Museum, East Gardens, Tokyo
Omotesando Hills shopping mall, Tokyo (architect: Tadao Ando)
Metropolitan Government Building, Tokyo
Toshogu shrine, Nikko
Osaka Castle, Osaka
Italian House, Kobe

If you’d like to see more of what I saw, did, and ate, have a look at #WhiteCabanaGoesToJapan.

Travel: 10 Pieces of Art and Architecture to See in Paris

Last week, I wrote a post about 10 places to eat in Paris. Today, I’m sharing 10 (plus a bonus) of the art and architecture that caught my attention on my recent trip.

1.Le Louvre. If you’re keen on architecture, the Louvre is a great place to start. Whether you line up to go in or remain on the outside, you are sure to be impressed. The buildings are magnificent. (1st arrondissement)

2. Le Palais Royale. Just a few blocks away from Le Louvre, is the courtyard of the Palais Royal. The courtyard is filled with 260 black and white columns – an art installation by Daniel Buren. (1st arr.)

3. Palais Garnier. The Palais Garnier has been one of my all-time favourite buildings in Paris. I love the symmetry of the facade and the golden sculptures (harmony on the left and poetry on the right as you face the building) on either side. Apollo stands int he middle. On the inside of the building, the Marc Chagall painted ceiling (which was painted in 1964) in the auditorium is worth seeing in person. (9th arr.)

4. Le Pouce (The thumb). A 40-foot thumb sculpture stands at La DĂ©fense. I don’t particularly love this sculpture, but it was one that I hadn’t ever seen before, so I wanted to share it. Among the modern skyscrapers in this business district, the sculpture kind of sticks out, well, like a big thumb. Ha ha! The 18-ton sculpture was built in 1965 by sculptor CĂ©sar Baldaccini.

5. Arc de Triomphe. The size of this structure, and the chaotic traffic that circles it, is definitely a sight to see. I’d suggest you climb the tower. This is one of my favourite views of the city (another favourite view is from the Tour de Montparnasse). (16th, 17th, and 8th arr.)

6. Hotel Le Meurice. There are many luxury hotels in Paris, many of which receive the “grand hotel” distinction. I mentioned one in my last post – the Luetitia, which is the only grand hotel on the left bank. On the right bank, there are several, including Le Meurice on Rue de Rivoli. I mention this one today because I had the chance to attend a networking event there. It’s spectacular. It’s charming. It’s so very French. It’s rich with history. I was pleased that my interactions with the staff were all very positive. Each person was kind and helpful and not at all pretentious. (1st arr.)

7. Doors. Doors. Doors. If you’re interested in architecture, you could spend hours looking at, examining, and taking photos of doors and doorways. The doors of Paris are impressive because of their size, colours, and details.

8. Place des Vosges. This is one of my most favourite pieces of architecture in Paris. I know I’ve already said this several times in this post, but it’s true. I love this square. It is indeed a true square at 140m x 140m. It was built between 1605 and 1612. Incredible, right? When I traveled to Paris when I was younger, I had several picnics in the park at Places des Vosges. Laying on the grass under the sunshine on a lazy afternoon is a great way to take a break from the busyness of the city. It’s the Parisian way. (3rd & 4th arr.)

9. Centre Pompidou. Many people don’t like this colourful, modern piece of architecture, but I do. I like the drastic contrast between the Centre Pompidou in its surrounding buildings. I like the art that is infused in this area, too, even though this isn’t my favourite area in Paris for wandering about. (4th arr.)

10. The Eiffel Tower. Well of course this is on my list. No matter how many times I’ve seen it, I’m always impressed. Even though I know exactly what to expect when I get to the area of the Eiffel Tower, I’m always taken aback. This structure is terrific. Absolutely terrific. (7th arr.)

11. 23 Rue de Babylone. This is a bonus building that I came across on a new-to-me route I took one afternoon back to the hotel. I believe it’s an apartment building. I loved its rows of curved shutters. (7th arr.)

To see more of my time in Paris, have a look at #WhiteCabanaGoesToParis on Instagram.

Interiors: Beautiful Bathrooms

These bright, white bathrooms have caught my attention. Whether it’s the leaded glass windows, the marble sink surround, a lovely curvy tub, or the view, each of these bathrooms comes with something unique.

via Style Files

Lawless & Meyerson

Woollahra House

Studio KO, via Home World Design

Architects EAT, via The Design Chaser

Design: Minimalist Ways

Some days, I really want to get rid of everything I own and start fresh as a minimalist. Yes, even though I do really love all of my collections! But just look at these spaces. Every piece, every fixture, every finish is placed and purchased so thoughtfully.

Est Living

Est Living

Est Living

Est Living

Minimalissimo

Furniture: The D Shop

I came across the D Pages and the D Shop on one of my tours around the Internet, and I was drawn right on in. D Pages features beautiful interiors and architecture in all of my favourite shades of white. D Shop is an extension of that design inspiration and carries a collection of the most beautiful pieces of furniture, lighting, and home accessories. There is so much that caught my attention which is why I’m sharing so much of it here today.

Mategot Natasaki chair, $639 USD

Sereno marble coffee table, $3600 USD

Beetle stool, $559 USD

Pacha lounge chair, $2369 USD

Shepherd’s chair, $3500 USD

Amare salt and pepper set, $195 USD

Dearborn large bowl, $80 USD

Signal globe, $1645 USD

Trivia Thursday: The Standard Chair

Jean ProuvĂ© was a French industrial designer and architect. While he may not be as well known as designers like Eames and Herman Miller, ProuvĂ© certainly made his mark in the design world. One of his most recognizable works might be The Standard chair. I first came across the chair when I stayed in this Paris apartment. It was love at first sight! Not only do I like the design, but the chair is incredibly comfortable. It’s little wonder why it’s a sought-after piece by designers and collectors of beautiful design.

The Standard

photos via Vitra

Jean Prouvé chairs in the Rue Bonaparte apartment (where I stayed in 2014)

Galerie Miquel Alzueta, via Pastolux

Airhouse Design Office, via Contemporist

Paris apartment, via Architectural Digest

The Friday Five: Calatrava Architecture

About a decade ago, I travelled to the Canary Islands, and on the island of Tenerife, I was struck by the architecture of the El Auditorio. The Auditorio de Tenerife was designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, and his architecture is the focus of today’s post.

White Cabana (a few more photos of my trip to the El Auditorio)

Canarias 7

Here are five other favourites from Calatrava’s extensive collection of white projects.

If you’re in Toronto, you may recognize another Calatrava – the BCE Place Galleria (built in 1992). I remember going to BCE Place when I was young, and I was in awe of the light that came through this building. Another visit is long overdue!

BCE Place

In 2016, Calatrava created the transportation hub at the World Trade Center in New York City. The structure looks like it’s about to take flight.

via Dezeen

I love the repetition of shapes on this building in Valencia, Spain.

Ciudad de las Artes y de las Ciencias

The Milwaukee Art Museum is striking, too, with its dramatic points and curves.

via Simply Sinova

via

Finally, this building at Florida’s Polytechnic University easily caught my eye. In fact, it caught my eye a couple of years ago on a drive from Tampa to Orlando, but I never pulled over to investigate it up-close. Maybe I’ll get an close-up view if if I end up taking the same road trip in a few weeks!

via Dezeen

Have a great weekend, everyone!

Design: Poolside

This weekend really felt like summer. I celebrated the completion of my MBA with family and friends, I ate ice cream, and I spent time at the pool.

So today, to “cool off,” I’m taking you on a virtual tour of some spectacular pools. Ready to dive in?

Bulgari Hotel, photo by Christina Arrighi

via Reno Guide

Bradley E. Heppner

Rolling Stone Landscapes

House Chapple, Tribe Studio Architects

Architecture: A-Frame Cottages

I was in Goderich and Bayfield on Saturday because Ontario beach time has been long overdue for me. It was an absolutely wonderful day out, and it got me dreaming (again) about owning a cottage one day (remember this cottage post from November).

Recently, my cottage dreams seem to lead me to the classic A-frame style. The A-frame (literally shaped like the letter A) style appeals to me for a cottage because it looks cozy, seems to blend in well with country surroundings, and mimics the shape of trees. I don’t know. I just think it looks kind of cool. And with a white interior? I think it would be fun.

So, naturally, my dreams have led me to create this blog post featuring cool A-frame houses (or cottages) that I find so darn beautiful.

Bromley Caldari 

source unknown

Lokal A-Frame, Maurice River

Allandale House, William O’Brien Jr.

Jean Verville

VRBO

Whistler A-frame, Scott and Scott Architects

Architecture: A Beautiful Barn

I saw images of this Texas barn venue on Pinterest, and I was eager to see more. The White Sparrow Barn looks to be primarily used as a wedding venue, but I think a party of any sort would be beautiful in this stunning space.

Pretty, right?

Architecture: A Building with Curves

I took a double-take when I came across Zaha Hadid‘s Heydar Aliyev Center in Azerbaijan. Why? Because not a single straight line was used. Curves. This building has curves and only curves!

Heydar Aliyev Center

exterior

interior

auditorium

exhibition hall

interior

exterior

It’s pretty cool, isn’t it?

Architecture: Lego House

If my nephews had their way, they’d live in this Lego House. But they’d probably want it to be all blue or green or red. And have life-size Lego Ninjago out front, too.

I, of course, prefer the Lego House as it is in white. Isn’t it amazing?

Lego House, designed by Bjarke Ingels Group, via Minimalissimo

Trivia Thursday: Book Matched Marble

What is book matched marble? It’s when two slabs of marble are set side-by-side like a mirror image, resembling the pages of an open book. The result is absolutely beautiful. As if marble on its own wasn’t beautiful enough, right?

Cecconi Simone via Contemporist

Marble of the World

WK

Houzz

Because I’m Addicted

Marketplace: Cool Things

There’s no real method to today’s post. It’s just a round-up of things that I’ve come across or that people have sent me that look pretty darn cool.

Martha Medeiros via The Sil

knots by Windy Chien, via A Pair and a Spare

Iittala x Issey Miyake bag, $185 USD, Need Supply

Hovding 2.0 bike helmet, €299, Hovding (thanks, JS)

glass rulers, $54 USD, Areaware (via SwissMiss)

design by James Whitaker, via DeZeen

white concrete chairs, via Design Milk

Happy Monday, everyone!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Architecture: White in Waterloo

The fall is generally a beautiful time to be outdoors. Since it’s neither ridiculously cold nor unbearably hot, it’s the perfect season to be outside and go for long walks. I’ve been doing my best to go on early morning walks, and they’ve honestly set my days off right. Yes, of course, it’s challenging to wake up extra early, especially when it’s dark outside, and throw on workout wear, but once I’ve gotten a few steps in, I feel awake and I’m happy. I also love the post-walk feeling. I feel fresh and ready to begin my day.

Besides feeling great, I absolutely love looking at the beautiful houses around Uptown Waterloo. Honestly, they are some of the prettiest ones I’ve seen! This past weekend, I managed to take my walks during the daylight, so it was especially nice to snap a couple of photos. Look at these two beauties!

This first one has beautiful symmetry, a gorgeous entry, and a pretty pair of fall urns. I just love the style.

This second one is smaller in scale, but so darn pretty. And the white Audi Q5 in the driveway basically has me moving right on in! Love it.What do you do to stay active? And are you like me in that you love observing the architecture in your neighbourhood?

Save

Save

Save

Save

Architecture: Jean Verville

I recently came across the work of architect Jean Verville, and I was soon lost in a website of beautiful design projects. Here are some spaces that really caught my eye.

unitĂ© d’habitation Westmount Square

Fahouse 

In 2

whitepaper

Save

Travel: Review of Hotel Henry, Buffalo

When I first learned about Buffalo’s newly opened Hotel Henry, I was intrigued. And I was curious. And I was dubious, too. A must-see hotel? Sure. In Buffalo? Not so sure. You see, the Buffalo I have known up until this summer is all outlet mall and Target. Honestly. I have not seen much more than that on any of my trips to Buffalo. Well, let me tell you, Buffalo surprised me. Really! So much so that I’d definitely make a return trip! Isn’t that what you’d like the result of every vacation to be? I was pleasantly surprised!

You’ve seen a couple of photos of my trip on Instagram (#WhiteCabanaGoestoBuffalo), but here’s a proper tour of the hotel.

Hotel Henry, a national historic site, was built in the 1872 as a psychiatric hospital (aka known as the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane). I didn’t know much of this history before I arrived which I think is a good thing. I was too googly-eyed over the design and architecture to get too engrossed in all the historical – and spooky!? – stories. As we pulled up to the property, I was floored. Amazed at the large scale and the absolutely beautiful architecture. I was definitely excited as I stepped inside.

The hotel has been part of a 3-year, $102 million renovation project. The hotel is located on a 42-acre site and occupies three of the eleven buildings of the former asylum. The project was led by Deborah Berke Partners and Flynn Battaglia Architects. Just to give you an idea of the scale and work involved, the restoration of 600 windows cost $7 million.

 

Check in was smooth and quick. My room was spacious with ridiculously high ceilings that definitely caught my attention! Beds were comfortable, and the bath products were lovely. Towels were fluffy, and the coffee/tea station was a nice addition. There was plenty of space to spread out, rest, and work (the desk in front of the window was well-planned).

I think it would be lovely if Hotel Henry added robes to the room and a mini fridge, too. These items aren’t essential, but they’re nice pluses for a luxurious stay.

 

Beyond the room, the hotel is absolutely stunning. The foyer and lounges are well-appointed with beautifully designed furniture and accessories. Interesting and unique art is everywhere in the public spaces and guest rooms. The lighting is dramatic and eye-catching.

During my stay, I had the chance to enjoy the bar one evening and breakfast by 100 Acres – the hotel restaurant that is becoming one of Buffalo’s hot spots! I enjoyed both, and loved parking myself in different areas around the hotel to enjoy my drink and meal. Each area offers lovely seating options and great views of the architecture and art.

The next time I go to Hotel Henry, I’m definitely going to sign up for a tour of the abandoned/non-renovated part of the Richardson Olmsted property. If I had known about these public tours before I arrived, I would have signed up, but it completely escaped my research and planning path. In addition to the tour, I’d like to explore other architectural, artistic, and neighbourhood gems.

Prices per night vary depending on day and month, but they average about $150 USD per night. Check the availability calendar for the most accurate price.

Thanks to Hotel Henry for sponsoring this post. All photos and opinions are my own.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Design: McKinley Burkart Architecture

I don’t know how Instagram algorithms work, but sometimes the fancy behind-the-scenes technology really works in my favour. Recently, Instagram introduced me to the work of McKinley Burkart. This architecture and interior design firm, which has studios in Calgary and Vancouver, has an extensive portfolio of beautiful restaurants, retail, residential, and work spaces.

Bruce Lifestyle Store

M-Tech

Market

Village Ice Cream

Earls Westhills

Elbow Park House

The Shore

IHS

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Design: A Notting Hill Kitchen

This kitchen in Notting Hill, UK has so many stunning details. The marble, the moulding, the brass, and the floors have all caught my eye. And since there’s already a Bialetti espresso maker in place, I can basically move in. Yup. I could!

Blenheim Crescent kitchen by Blakes London

Travel: White Cabana Goes to Toronto

I just came back from an extended stay in Toronto. I was there for an academic conference. My presentations went smoothly, and it was great to catch up with my academic community in person (#PhDlife). While I was there, I couldn’t help but snap photos.

Hydrangea pompoms in my parents’ garden. I love them!

The Crystal at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) is one of my favourite buildings in the city.

Toronto in one photo: CN Tower in the background, TTC and postal-code-clad mail box in the foreground.

Skateboard action in front of the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO).

Canadian chefs’ panel presentation at Terroir Symposium: Chef Lynn Crawford, Dufflet Rosenberg, Susur Lee, and Matty Matheson (full review coming soon)

If you’d like to see a few more photos (mostly of my outfits), check out #WhiteCabanaGoestoToronto.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Two for Tuesday: Perfect Pantries

I’ve been taking part in Apartment Therapy’s January Cure clean-up and organization challenge on a sort of regular basis this month. Buying flowers was easy, cleaning the fridge was completely satisfying, and donating boxes of extras was freeing. While I haven’t been able to keep up with the daily tasks, I think Apartment Therapy’s month of chores is well-planned and well-organized. It’s a good way to kick start the year!

So this brings me to the idea of organization. Check out these two pantries. Aren’t they beautiful? Yes, a beautiful storage area for food. That’s luxury!

via Zillow (this stunning house has sold!)

via Hayburn (house is beautiful)

Architecture: Old Ontario Houses

When I was in the Niagara region recently, I took several photos of gorgeous houses, including this lovely yellow home. I always seem to notice new ones when I’m there. And each on in Niagara-on-the-Lake is especially interesting and unique. We have gorgeous properties in the Waterloo region, which I ogle, and I always paid attention to the details of these homes when I lived in London and Kingston. They ooze charm, and they catch my eye!

And that’s why I’m a sucker for the Instagram account called Old Ontario Houses. Do you know it? Caution – you may not notice the time fly by once you start scrolling and reading about the locations of each house!

Here are a few white ones that caught my attention as I was scrolling through the feed recently:

Yates Street Heritage District, St. Catharines

Niagara-on-the-Lake

Niagara-on-the-Lake

St. David’s

Jordan Village

St. Mary’s

St. Thomas

Since it’s #Canada150 this year, maybe it’s about time I – or we – should start paying extra attention to white architecture in our beautiful country!

Save

Save

Save

The Friday Five: White Architecture

It’s been a while since I have focused on the design of buildings and homes, so today I’m bringing you five photos of cool architecture.

museo-international-del-barroco-toyo-ito-architecture-museum-public-mexico-patrick-lopez-jaimes_dezeen_936_30-1

Museo Internacional del Barroco by Toyo Ito, near Puebla, Mexico, via Dezeen

artelabo-villa-tranquille-quiet-house-herault-valley-south-of-france-designboom-03

country villa in France designed by Artelabo, via DesignBoom

vector-architects-chapel-by-the-beach-designboom-02-818x979

seashore chapel in China by Vector Architects, via DesignBoom

002_ula5019-modifier

Le Nook in Quebec by MU Architecture, via DesignBoom

4291-06rs

factory in Germany by Sanaa, via UnCubeMagazine

Have a great weekend, everyone!

Save

Save

1 2 3