Art

Design: A Round-Up of Unique Products

In my travels online, I’ve come across some interesting products – or concepts for products – that have caught my attention. The designers of these items have so much talent. I tried to include their websites whenever possible, so you can click through and see what other designs they’ve dreamed up.

ME dinner set – by Moak Studio
bread oven, part of the Bread from Scratch collection – by Mirko Ihrig
bicycle picnic set (attaches to the back rack) – by Morgane Ratton – via Blog Esprit Design
Balena – by Dossofiorito
coin bank storage – by Mai Peishan – via Behance
hourglass by Lihi Svirsky – via Design Break
Exploded chair – by Joyce Lin – via Blog Esprit Design
concept kitchen appliance range – by No Picnic
fan ine – by Simona Hruskova
aventure romantique backpack Vacheron Constantin – by Panter & Tourron

Travel: 10 Pieces of Art and Architecture to See in Paris

Last week, I wrote a post about 10 places to eat in Paris. Today, I’m sharing 10 (plus a bonus) of the art and architecture that caught my attention on my recent trip.

1.Le Louvre. If you’re keen on architecture, the Louvre is a great place to start. Whether you line up to go in or remain on the outside, you are sure to be impressed. The buildings are magnificent. (1st arrondissement)

2. Le Palais Royale. Just a few blocks away from Le Louvre, is the courtyard of the Palais Royal. The courtyard is filled with 260 black and white columns – an art installation by Daniel Buren. (1st arr.)

3. Palais Garnier. The Palais Garnier has been one of my all-time favourite buildings in Paris. I love the symmetry of the facade and the golden sculptures (harmony on the left and poetry on the right as you face the building) on either side. Apollo stands int he middle. On the inside of the building, the Marc Chagall painted ceiling (which was painted in 1964) in the auditorium is worth seeing in person. (9th arr.)

4. Le Pouce (The thumb). A 40-foot thumb sculpture stands at La Défense. I don’t particularly love this sculpture, but it was one that I hadn’t ever seen before, so I wanted to share it. Among the modern skyscrapers in this business district, the sculpture kind of sticks out, well, like a big thumb. Ha ha! The 18-ton sculpture was built in 1965 by sculptor César Baldaccini.

5. Arc de Triomphe. The size of this structure, and the chaotic traffic that circles it, is definitely a sight to see. I’d suggest you climb the tower. This is one of my favourite views of the city (another favourite view is from the Tour de Montparnasse). (16th, 17th, and 8th arr.)

6. Hotel Le Meurice. There are many luxury hotels in Paris, many of which receive the “grand hotel” distinction. I mentioned one in my last post – the Luetitia, which is the only grand hotel on the left bank. On the right bank, there are several, including Le Meurice on Rue de Rivoli. I mention this one today because I had the chance to attend a networking event there. It’s spectacular. It’s charming. It’s so very French. It’s rich with history. I was pleased that my interactions with the staff were all very positive. Each person was kind and helpful and not at all pretentious. (1st arr.)

7. Doors. Doors. Doors. If you’re interested in architecture, you could spend hours looking at, examining, and taking photos of doors and doorways. The doors of Paris are impressive because of their size, colours, and details.

8. Place des Vosges. This is one of my most favourite pieces of architecture in Paris. I know I’ve already said this several times in this post, but it’s true. I love this square. It is indeed a true square at 140m x 140m. It was built between 1605 and 1612. Incredible, right? When I traveled to Paris when I was younger, I had several picnics in the park at Places des Vosges. Laying on the grass under the sunshine on a lazy afternoon is a great way to take a break from the busyness of the city. It’s the Parisian way. (3rd & 4th arr.)

9. Centre Pompidou. Many people don’t like this colourful, modern piece of architecture, but I do. I like the drastic contrast between the Centre Pompidou in its surrounding buildings. I like the art that is infused in this area, too, even though this isn’t my favourite area in Paris for wandering about. (4th arr.)

10. The Eiffel Tower. Well of course this is on my list. No matter how many times I’ve seen it, I’m always impressed. Even though I know exactly what to expect when I get to the area of the Eiffel Tower, I’m always taken aback. This structure is terrific. Absolutely terrific. (7th arr.)

11. 23 Rue de Babylone. This is a bonus building that I came across on a new-to-me route I took one afternoon back to the hotel. I believe it’s an apartment building. I loved its rows of curved shutters. (7th arr.)

To see more of my time in Paris, have a look at #WhiteCabanaGoesToParis on Instagram.

Art: Photography at 1stDibs

It’s been a (long) while since I featured black and white photography, so today’s the day. All these pieces are available from 1stDibs.

Art: Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto

Last weekend, I went to the opening of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Toronto. It was interesting to go to that part of Toronto (Bloor/Lansdowne) as my mom grew up in the neighbourhood, and so much has changed since she left. Although I don’t remember much about her childhood home as I was very young when my grandfather moved out of it, I do remember a lot of her stories, and seeing the area – what with the addition of MOCA and Drake Commissary – just made me think about the passing of time and the evolution of Toronto. It certainly wasn’t as “hip” as it is now when my mom lived there.Beyond my mini walk down memory lane, the opening of MOCA was busy. The stylish artsy crowd mixed in beautifully with families and kids of all ages. The place was hopping! What I most enjoyed was speaking with the artists. My friends and I spoke with Nep Sidhu who is the artist behind several incredible textiles. One of his pieces – part of his When My Drums Come Knocking, They Watch series – was inspired by Kahil El’Zabar. Sir Kahil El’Zabar was also at MOCA, and he took the time to chat with us about jazz, Chicago, and, of course, art. On such a busy day, with so many people wanting to speak to the artists, I was impressed at how they shared their stories in such a relaxed and open way.

The work of Tim Whiten caught my attention not just because his pieces were in my favourite colour, but because they’re made of glass. Absolutely stunning.

Then there was the large-sized graphic words of LA-based artist Barbara Kruger. You can see more of Barbara Kruger’s works on ArtNet.

The MOCA is five floors of interesting art installations. There are quite a few video exhibits on at the moment in addition to graphic art, sculpture, and mixed media installations. There’s an interactive area for kids, too.

If you like contemporary art, then I’m sure you’ll be happy to visit MOCA. It’s a great addition to Toronto’s art and museum community.

Trivia Thursday: Fornasetti

Piero Fornasetti was in Italian painter, sculptor, interior decorator, and engraver. He may be best known for his pieces that include the image of a woman’s face in black and white. The face is that of operatic soprano Lina Cavalieri. In addition to this face, many of his pieces include images of the sun, time, and architectural elements. Now, his son Barnaba Fornasetti continues to design in his father’s name.

Piero Fornasetti

Occio side table

Bocca chair

Architettura cabinet

Teste Antiche umbrella stand

plate

Fornasetti’s plates are quite popular in the world of interior design. These and other Fornasetti pieces add whimsy and interest to many spaces as you can see in the images below.

Colette May, via Elements of Style

Colette May, via Elements of Style

House & Garden

 via Archimir

via Est Magazine

WGSN

If you have some time to spare, I encourage you to watch some of these behind-the-scenes videos of the Fornasetti Atelier. I enjoyed watching a bit of the design and manufacturing processes of Fornasetti’s pottery, textiles, and metal work.

The Friday Five: Oversize Art

Note to self: Find a wall to hang/lean a piece of oversized art. I do love a good gallery wall (see my office in Style at Home), but a wall featuring a massive photograph creates a “wow” moment, too.

Kara Rosenlund

William Waldron

Sun N Salt, Etsy

Kara Rosenlund

designer – Ashley Botten, via House & Home

Design: A Framed Hermès

If you have an extra Hermès in your closet that you no longer wear, you may consider framing it. Since each piece is a work of art, it would fit right into a home’s decor.

Tamara Eaton, Simply Framed

Sarah Blakely, Style at Home

Hanna Maiqvist

Monika Hibbs, Photo by Tracy Ayton, via PopSugar

Tom Samet

Tamara Eaton, Simply Framed

Trivia Thursday: The Alvar Aalto Vase

Recognize this wavy vase?

Iittala

It was designed by Alvar Aalto in 1936, and it has been a design collector’s item ever since. Each vase is mouth blown at the Iittala glass factory in Finland, making each piece unique. The full Alvar Aalto collection includes other shapes, sizes, and colours, too.

If you’re in Canada, you can purchase Alvar Aalto pieces at William Ashley.

Two for Tuesday: Art Cubes

I was in Saskatoon last week for a conference, and when I had a spare moment post-conference, I opted to visit the Remai Modern. What a good decision that was! I was in awe of the building and the art, and if you follow me on Instagram (#WhiteCabanaGoestoSaskatoon), then you know that I couldn’t stop posting about it!

There was plenty of white in the spaces and in the art, but one of the most impressive exhibits was Haegue Yang’s Sol LeWitt Upside Down. Is it ever cool! Haegue Yang is a South Korean artist who lives and works in Berlin and Seoul.

Sol LeWitt Upside Down by Haegue Yang at the Remai Modern, Saskatoon (photo by me)

If you look closely, you can see that these cubes are composed of blinds. Window blinds!

Sol LeWitt Upside Down by Haegue Yang at the Remai Modern, Saskatoon (photo by me)

What I learned from Kayla (one of the Remai Modern guides) is that Haegue Yang’s piece was inspired by American artist Sol LeWitt‘s Incomplete Open Cubes.

 via The Met

The Friday Five: Leaning Art

What do you think about leaning art and books? I have things leaning in a few spots in my house, and I really enjoy layering art. I love being surrounded by cool art pieces, and by layering them, I can switch things around when I need a change.

Here are five inspiring spaces that are accented by leaning art walls.

via Carla Aston

via Carla Aston

via Habitually Chic

via My Scandinavian Home

via Could I Have That

Have a great weekend, everyone!

Trivia Thursday: Eames Hang It All

There are coat racks, and then there are coat racks. Designed in 1953, the Eames Hang It All coat rack is a stand-out with its fun wooden balls. It was originally designed with the aim of encouraging children to hang up their own clothes. While the colourful Hang It All gets a lot of attention, the black and white versions are also deserving of our attention. 

Eames Hang-it-All, $211 (on sale), EQ3

Vitra Home Stories

via My Scandinavian Home

photo by Brigitta Wolfgang, via Seventy Nine Ideas

photo by Anders Bergstedt, Style and Create

via Decor8

Mitt Lille Hjerte

Marketplace: A Minted Christmas

This post has been sponsored by Minted. All opinions are my own.

If you’ve been a long-time reader of White Cabana, then you’ll likely know some of my favourite brands. Minted, the online marketplace for cards (and now art, fabric, and more!) has been one of my fave brands for quite some time. In fact, it was one of my first brand partnerships way back when White Cabana was just a newbie blog. While I have normally ordered cards and artwork, last year, I took a chance and ordered some fabric for my chaise. The fabric is beautiful. (You can read about my chaise makeover if you’d like.) I feel grateful that I can continue to work with Minted because I’m continually impressed by the work of Minted’s very talented artists.

Since it’s holiday time, it only makes sense that I now turn my attention to Minted’s collection of holiday items. I’ve worked with Minted for the last several years on my holiday card order. My favourite part of the ordering process is browsing through the card designs. This usually takes me a few days because I save a lot of designs in my favourites folder, and then eliminate them as I narrow down my preferences. I definitely put the filters to use to limit the designs by type (e.g., no photo, folded card) and colour (heavy on the white).

Once I’ve chosen my design, the rest of the ordering process takes minutes. Since I have an account, I simply need to write my greeting, review my saved-from-last-year recipient address list, and ensure my return address gets automatically printed on the back. Poof! Done! The order of cards arrives within days. Beautifully and safely packaged, I may add.

This year, I opted for the painted wreath designed by Baumbirdy of Chicago. You can see that the bow from the wreath is also printed on the envelope above the recipient’s address. How pretty!

While the original design had a holiday greeting in the middle of the wreath, I opted to remove it altogether, so that I’d have more white space on my card and the focus would be on the pretty wreath. I put my well wishes on the inside of the folded card. If you’ve ordered Minted cards before, then you’ll know that the text is quite customizable – wording, font, colours, spacing.

The pre-printed recipient and sender addresses option is amazing. I would recommend to pay the extra money for this option because not only is it beautiful, but it saves time. I’m a big fan of this option. Big. Huge. (Insert “Pretty Woman” emphasis.)

Besides these particular holiday cards, Minted’s holiday collection is lovely.

These non-photo cards were in my favourites folder for a long while.

Wintergarden by Kelly Hall

Merry Christmas, My Deers by Jinseikou (This one has been in my favourites folder for two years in a row. Look at this post from last year!)

Peaceful Reindeer by Gwen Bedat

A Nutcracker Christmas by Alexandra Dzh (this ended up being my runner-up option)

If you like minimalist photo cards, one of these designs might be for you. You’ll notice that you can even customize the card backing and envelope (at an extra cost).

Merry All Year by Pink House Press

Instant Gallery by Olivia Kanaley

In the business category of holiday cards, I like the following designs.

Stars by Lori Wemple

 Delicate Fern by Nicolette Myslinski

Holiday Wishes by Susan Moyal

Magnolia Wreath by Jennifer Postorino

If you’re feeling a touch overwhelmed by the holiday card selection process, why not order more than one design? I haven’t done this myself, but I have considered it. Can I also suggest that you order more cards that you think you need, too? Even though my address list is saved in my Minted account, I always seem to run out of cards. (Hmm…maybe I should spend more time working on adding things up more precisely.)

If you’re not sure how to upload and save recipient addresses, Minted has this guide to holiday cards which provides an easy overview of shapes and styles. I know there are a lot of cards to choose from, and uploading addresses may seem tedious, but once you’ve done it once, it’s done!

As I mentioned, Minted now offers much more than holiday cards to mark special celebrations. A few years ago, I ordered some table decorations to celebrate the completion of my PhD. The collection has now expanded beyond paper table runners. Now, for Christmas, Minted offers a cute selection of tree skirts, stockings, and wrapping paper.

Snow Covered Woods tree skirt

garden lights stocking

Christmas Trees by My Splendid Summer

Birds and Flowers by Leanne Friedberg

I know the holidays are right around the corner, so you may have already purchased holiday cards and decor. On the other hand, if you’re behind schedule, have no fear. Minted’s delivery deadline schedule will help guide you, so you can reach your shopping goals!

Happy shopping!

The Friday Five: Craving Warmth

I know I’m a day late with this week’s Friday Five, but I hope you don’t mind too much. It was a heck of a week, but all is well. End of term is really quite busy for my day job and my extra jobs and my #MBAlife. After a final presentation, final report, final exam, final classes, final team party, final…final…final, and a random case of strep throat, the week came to an end. I think I experienced every emotion this week.

And now it’s the weekend, and I’m excited for it! A friend and I managed to get out to a few local stores last night for some shopping, today is a book writing day (our book is set to be published in 2018!), and tomorrow is spa day! Woohoo! End-of-term season has its rewards!

For today’s (one-day-late) Friday Five, I’m sharing spaces and images that exude warmth. You know, because ’tis the season to be warm and cozy.

Caroline Feiffer‘s apartment, via Jenni Kayne

via Desde My Ventana

photo by Amy Bartlam, via My Domaine

100 Layer Cake, via Lonny

Nordic Design

Have a great weekend, everyone!

Trivia Thursday: Book Matched Marble

What is book matched marble? It’s when two slabs of marble are set side-by-side like a mirror image, resembling the pages of an open book. The result is absolutely beautiful. As if marble on its own wasn’t beautiful enough, right?

Cecconi Simone via Contemporist

Marble of the World

WK

Houzz

Because I’m Addicted

Book: Cast: Art and Objects

Have I mentioned how much I love receiving books in the mail? Well, I do. As a child and young teen, I was definitely not a bookworm. Books were my sister’s territory, not mine. As I neared adulthood, however, I became more interested in reading, and when I started university, I basically couldn’t stop. I read all sorts of books these days (slowly, though, I assure you), and I’m still one of those people who actually buys books. Softcover, hardcover, new, used, I’ll take ’em.

Recently, I was sent over a copy of the gorgeous book Cast: Art and Objects by Jen Townsend and Renée Zettle-Sterling to review. This book takes us through a historical journey of made objects. We learn about the process – historical and current – of making ceramic, metal, and glass objects. The photos are beautiful throughout, and the explanations carry through from objects – household and decorative – to art to jewelry.

   

I know I haven’t officially started gift guides yet, but if you’re looking to buy something for an artist, historian, or designer, give Cast some consideration!

Thanks to Sarah M. and Smith Publicity for sending this book my way. All opinions and photos are my own.

Books: Review of Why LA – Pourquoi Paris

I recently received a copy of the book Why LA? Pourquoi Paris? to review. While I have been to Los Angeles, it was a short trip, and I didn’t really get to live the LA life. Paris, on the other hand, is one of (who am I kidding – it is) my favourite city.

In this book, Diane Ratican compares the two cities on multiple aspects – food, culture architecture, fashion, art.

What’s really special, in my opinion, is that the text is in both French and English, and descriptions are followed by pages and pages of beautiful artwork. The illustrations were done by Eric Giriat and Nick Lu. It’s easy to stare at the pages for a while to see all the detailed work.

Over the long weekend, I read the book in one sitting. The text is informative and well-written. I learned a lot about LA, and learned a few new things about Paris, too.

Many thanks to Why LA? Pourquoi Paris? and Sarah at Smith for sending me this book.

All photos and opinions are my own.

 

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Travel: Review of Hotel Henry, Buffalo

When I first learned about Buffalo’s newly opened Hotel Henry, I was intrigued. And I was curious. And I was dubious, too. A must-see hotel? Sure. In Buffalo? Not so sure. You see, the Buffalo I have known up until this summer is all outlet mall and Target. Honestly. I have not seen much more than that on any of my trips to Buffalo. Well, let me tell you, Buffalo surprised me. Really! So much so that I’d definitely make a return trip! Isn’t that what you’d like the result of every vacation to be? I was pleasantly surprised!

You’ve seen a couple of photos of my trip on Instagram (#WhiteCabanaGoestoBuffalo), but here’s a proper tour of the hotel.

Hotel Henry, a national historic site, was built in the 1872 as a psychiatric hospital (aka known as the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane). I didn’t know much of this history before I arrived which I think is a good thing. I was too googly-eyed over the design and architecture to get too engrossed in all the historical – and spooky!? – stories. As we pulled up to the property, I was floored. Amazed at the large scale and the absolutely beautiful architecture. I was definitely excited as I stepped inside.

The hotel has been part of a 3-year, $102 million renovation project. The hotel is located on a 42-acre site and occupies three of the eleven buildings of the former asylum. The project was led by Deborah Berke Partners and Flynn Battaglia Architects. Just to give you an idea of the scale and work involved, the restoration of 600 windows cost $7 million.

 

Check in was smooth and quick. My room was spacious with ridiculously high ceilings that definitely caught my attention! Beds were comfortable, and the bath products were lovely. Towels were fluffy, and the coffee/tea station was a nice addition. There was plenty of space to spread out, rest, and work (the desk in front of the window was well-planned).

I think it would be lovely if Hotel Henry added robes to the room and a mini fridge, too. These items aren’t essential, but they’re nice pluses for a luxurious stay.

 

Beyond the room, the hotel is absolutely stunning. The foyer and lounges are well-appointed with beautifully designed furniture and accessories. Interesting and unique art is everywhere in the public spaces and guest rooms. The lighting is dramatic and eye-catching.

During my stay, I had the chance to enjoy the bar one evening and breakfast by 100 Acres – the hotel restaurant that is becoming one of Buffalo’s hot spots! I enjoyed both, and loved parking myself in different areas around the hotel to enjoy my drink and meal. Each area offers lovely seating options and great views of the architecture and art.

The next time I go to Hotel Henry, I’m definitely going to sign up for a tour of the abandoned/non-renovated part of the Richardson Olmsted property. If I had known about these public tours before I arrived, I would have signed up, but it completely escaped my research and planning path. In addition to the tour, I’d like to explore other architectural, artistic, and neighbourhood gems.

Prices per night vary depending on day and month, but they average about $150 USD per night. Check the availability calendar for the most accurate price.

Thanks to Hotel Henry for sponsoring this post. All photos and opinions are my own.

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The Friday Five: Beach Art

Oh, you know, I have the beach on my brain big tiiiime because I’m heading to my summer home-away-from-home soon! I’m pretty excited for some major relaxation time on the beach under the hot Floridian sun! So, in anticipation of long, lazy days and nights at the beach, I’m bringing some beachy to the blog today in the form of art!

white beach club, Italy, Gray Malin

white beach umbrellas, Italy, Gray Malin

white hot, Erin Beutel, Minted

iconic lifeguard tower, Kate Houlihan, Minted

collection, Sadie Holden, Minted

Have a great weekend, everyone!

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Two for Tuesday: Zebras

Do you have any zebra print in your home? I don’t, but it seems like of all the animal prints that I could have, this would be it, right? I wouldn’t be ready to install Scalamandre‘s zebra print wallpaper anytime soon, but a zebra print in smaller doses could easily find its way into my home.

Scalamandre by Lenox zebra decanter, $171, Bloomingdales

Zebra print, $25+, Sharon Montrose

Interiors: House Tour, Chapel Hill, NC

One of the things on my North Carolina “must-see” list during my recent visit was “tour Kristie’s house.” Seriously. Have you ever asked an almost-stranger for a house tour? Because I have. Okay, so Kristie isn’t a complete stranger. She’s one of my sister’s good friends, and I have actually met her a couple of times.

So, on this visit, Kristie graciously opened her home to me for an after-school visit. And lucky for all of us, she allowed me to snap a bunch of photos to share right here on White Cabana (no styling involved, btw!). You may have seen a few photos floating around Instagram (the kitchen, the porch, the art), and I know that if you did, you were itching to see more. Well, today’s your lucky day.

Let’s get to it.

The foyer is bright, welcoming, and so beautifully curated. Kristie’s collectibles are from all over – furniture stores, HomeGoods, antique markets, the ReStore, consignment shops, and Craigslist.

The kitchen’s waterfall marble island and chandeliers are show stoppers. In fact, the lighting throughout the home is so well-chosen.

(custom cupboard doors will be painted soon!)

Are you drooling? Yes, I know you are! I had the same reaction, so there’s no need to be embarrassed!

Kristie made much of the art in her home including the colourful pieces framed in gold on the dining room gallery wall. Stunning!

(side note: I took a page out of Kristie’s design book, and picked up this swan for my bedroom. It’s nowhere near as refined as the one in this dining room, but I love it. #copycat)

The powder room is almost done. Kristie is just waiting on a mirror. I think it looks great as is, actually!

In the living room you’ll see my most favourite piece of art – made by Kristie! It’s a 3D piece made of paper! In.cred.ible. The 10+ foot ceilings are a nice touch, too.  

Hallways were given attention, too.

ink art made by Kristie and her daughter (and a pineapple for good measure)

Kristie paid careful attention to the design of her kids’ rooms, too. I could move into either of them. I really wanted to grab the federal mirror off the wall and stuff it into my carry-on, but I thought her little boy might notice. Darn.

  

We’re just about at the end of this tour, unfortunately, but I’m leaving you with one of my favourite spaces – the screened-in porch. The porch is a common feature in homes in North Carolina. It’s a pleasant room for lounging and entertaining during the fall, spring, and summer months. I’d easily sip on a mint julep while lounging on this sweet soft blue sofa.

Kristie – or Dr. Kristie, I should say, since she has a PhD in textiles (who knew that was an option!?) – and her family recently moved into this home and undertook a great renovation where the kitchen space was re-jigged and expanded, walls were painted, hardwood was installed, and art was hung everywhere.

There are still things on the must-complete list as all renos seem to have, but for now, this place is set, and the whole family is enjoying their new home.

Thanks, Kristie and family, for letting us peek into your gorgeous home!

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Art & Hotel: 21c Museum Hotel, Durham, North Carolina

While most of my weekend in North Carolina was spent playing with my three nephews and niece (#ZiaJojoComesToTown), my sister, brother-in-law, and I did enjoy one night out in Durham sans cute children. One of our stops was the 21c Museum Hotel and Counting House. The concept is unique. On the main floor, you’ll find the Counting House – a bar and restaurant. Above, you can wander the floors to explore the art exhibits and historic building, which is open 24/7/365 with free admission if you’re curious. Cool, right? In the basement, visitors can explore the old bank vault since the 21c Museum Hotel is housed in an old bank. Food, drinks, art, history, and a place to stay all in one gorgeous building in central Durham? What’s not to love?

Here are some of the photos I took, if you’d like to see.

Mujer de Blanco, 2015, Marlu Palacios

Spoonfall – water trickling down hinged spoons making the most soothing sounds

Sleeping, 2007, Anthony Goicolea (available for purchase at Caviar20 if you have $18,500 to spare)

The bathroom was wild. I felt like I was in an episode of CSI. Art and function. Awesome. The signage is part of the We Don’t Care exhibition.

You’ll notice fuchsia penguins hanging around the hotel. Guests are encouraged to move them around to create new scenes – or surprises – for others. (Each hotel in the 21c collection has a different colour for its penguins.)

While I did not stay at the hotel, the rooms do look very White Cabana worthy! Perhaps on a future visit to Durham…or Nashville…or Cincinnati…I will check into a 21c Museum Hotel!

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Art: The Artbarn Auction

I love when people see white goodies and think of White Cabana! That’s what recently happened to Shannon (8foot6) who emailed me this photo of Tamim Sahib Zader’s white-on-white silkscreen.

silkscreen by Tamim Sahib Zader

This art piece is up for grabs at the Artbarn art auction online (currently) and offline this Thursday, February 9th in Toronto. The funds raised are going to support the Artbarn art school.

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Art: Lauren Clay

I’ve got loads to share from my weekend and a neat blog link up in the works for this week, but I thought I’d start the week off with some art because I think it would do us all some good to get some exposure to different kinds of art in 2017.

So, today, let me introduce you to Lauren Clay‘s large-scale sculptures. I see them as large, tamed marshmellow shapes.

  Hand of Devi

For the Big Bellied

Monochrome with Cowlick

Monochrome with Roof and Loops

Thanks to Design Crush for introducing me to the work of Lauren Clay.

Art: Beauty in White

I’m starting off 2017 with art. While I have written about art regularly on the blog, I would like to add more art content to the pages of White Cabana this year. There are so many stunning pieces of affordable – and beyond my budget – art out there that I’d like to share it with you.

Under $100

 

Ballroom 2 by Haley Warner, Minted, $25USD for 10″x8″

Linger by Sarah McInroe, Minted, $25USD for 8″x10″

Scoring Through by Van Tsao, Minted, $25USD for 8″x10″

Under $200

Rose Petals by Jelena Kostic, $175, 20″x28″

Under $500

Diver II by William Stafford, $295USD, One Kings Lane

Molten Ecru by Simone Webb, $260CAD for 12″x14″

Think by Tommy Ingberg, $375USD

Over $1000

Queen drawing by Charles Pachter, $9500, Caviar20

Eileen Lake by Adolf Arthur Dehn, $3314CAD, 1stDibs

The Party is Over by Gemma Gené, $6400USD

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Marketplace: Minted Cards for the Holidays

Around this time for the last few years, I’ve ordered my Christmas cards via Minted. With Minted, I can personalize my message, have my return address printed, and use my saved recipient address list (free service!) to ensure my cards are perfectly addressed.

I have been a fan of Minted’s collection of art and stationery for years. And each year, I’m impressed by the new additions of artistic cards. While I do appreciate photo cards from my friends and family, I opt for the classic card.

Here are some of the cards that made my short list:

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evergreen merry

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Christmas trees

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holiday bouquet

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Merry Christmas, My Deersmin-bid-hmc-003_a_pd

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One of the things that I really like about ordering my cards at Minted is the personalized printed message options. Last year, I decided to go all-out with the everyone-gets-the-same-message, and I ended up mailing my cards out without a personal message or signature. Let me tell you – these did not go over well. On my end, prepping my cards was very time efficient. Some of my honest friends and family members, however, were quick to inform me that they didn’t like the lack of real-live ink. So, this year, I’ve toned the automatic-standard-everything down a notch. I’ll be picking up my pen to add notes of well wishes.

Minted cards are printed on high quality paper. Its Signature paper is thick and luxe. I just love how the cards look printed…they’re so pretty and professional. And here’s hoping my friends and family enjoy the design I ordered this year!

Thanks to Minted and BlogPodium for this partnership opportunity.

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#WhiteCabanaWearsPink: Superheroes

Today’s #WhiteCabanaWearsPink theme is all about the superhero!

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flying superhero costume, Etsy

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Wonder Woman postcard, Etsy

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superhero printable download, Etsy

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Princess Power Super Sparkle Barbie

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Every Monday in the month of October, pink will be taking over White Cabana. This month, #WhiteCabanaWearsPink to raise awareness and funds for breast cancer research. Read more about #WhiteCabanaWearsPink.

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Marketplace: The Spartan Shop

In one of my various online surfing adventures, I came across Spartan Shop and fell in love with just about every product in its inventory. One more beautiful than the next. Let’s just say I lingered a little while on the site.

Look at these beauties:

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Gabriela Artigas two-tone infinite cuff, $270

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Scosha brass double opal cuff, $225

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takara jade coron necklace, $275

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spotted door mat, $80

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Lyngby porcelain vases, $87

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clam lab pointed spout pitcher, $290

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marble spice grinder with brass ball, $150

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#WhiteCabanaWearsPink: Beautiful Pink on Instagram

Over the last few weeks, I’ve come across so many gorgeous photos on Instagram featuring pink lovliness. Many of the photos I’ve saved, I have to admit, I’ve collected from Leslie Shewring who is the co-author of Decorate for a Party. Have a look….

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Leslie Shewring

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Leslie Shewring

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Sketch London by Leslie Shewring

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Leslie Shewring

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Leslie Shewring

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Leslie Shewring

pink-cloud-alice-in-her-palaceAlice in Her Palace

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Erica Cook

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Erica Cook

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Little Big Bell

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Tiffany Pratt

Aren’t these images so pretty?

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

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Every Monday in the month of October, pink will be taking over White Cabana. This month, #WhiteCabanaWearsPink to raise awareness and funds for breast cancer research. Read more about #WhiteCabanaWearsPink.

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#WhiteCabanaWearsPink: Art

Hold on to your hats, dear readers, because I’m bringing pink to the pages of White Cabana today!

As you may recall from my post last week, #WhiteCabanaWearsPink every Monday here on the blog. I ran 5K on Sunday at Kitchener-Waterloo’s CIBC Run for the Cure, and so far, I’ve raised $1148 for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. Woohoo! During my 5K run, I was thinking of all the people in my life who have been affected by breast cancer (and other kinds of cancer, too) as well as all my family and friends who generously donated to the cause (thank you!). I ran for the cure. And now I’m blogging for it.

To get the #WhiteCabanaWearsPink series going, I’m starting with some soft shades of pink and pretty artwork .

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Peony, Eye Candy Prints, Etsy

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Leave Behind the Shadows by Emily Jeffords, Minted

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Tower #4, Bree Madden, Etsy

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Flower Market 2, DENY Designs Catherine McDonald, Target

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Gold by Nastia Cloutier-Ignatiev, Citizen Atelier

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Erica Cook

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Janet Hill Studio

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Leigh Viner

Wishing all of you a wonderful week!

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Every Monday in the month of October, pink will be taking over White Cabana. This month, #WhiteCabanaWearsPink to raise awareness and funds for breast cancer research. Read more about #WhiteCabanaWearsPink. Affliliate links have been used, so get click happy!

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Photography: Chris Jordan

This term, I’m taking a course in my MBA program called Strategy for a Sustainable World. I’m three weeks in, and It’s been fascinating. In the course, we discuss how businesses are (and can and should be) operating with the environment in mind. Not so that the environment is an after-thought or embedded in a random policy that is tack on to an annual report, but that the environment plays a central role in how businesses are formed and how they operate.

In a recent lecture, we were introduced to the photographic work of Chris Jordan. He depicts the effects of consumerism (and other issues in America) in his works. Have a look:

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Office Paper: “Depicts 30,000 reams of office paper, or 15 million sheets, equal to the amount of office paper used in the US every five minutes.”

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Cigarettes: “Depicts 65,000 cigarettes, equal to the number of American teenagers under age eighteen who become addicted to cigarettes every month.”

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Paper Cups: “Depicts 410,000 paper cups, equal to the number of disposable hot-beverage paper cups used in the US every fifteen minutes.”

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Silent Spring: “Depicts 183,000 birds, equal to the estimated number of birds that die in the United States every day from exposure to agricultural pesticides.”

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Pain Killers: “Depicts 213,000 Vicodin pills, equal to the number of emergency room visits yearly in the US related to misuse or abuse of prescription pain killers.”

I encourage you to click each one of the links so that you can zoom-in/zoom-out on the photographs.

Images and descriptions from Chris Jordan.

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The Friday Five: Beautiful Art

Now that school (MBA life and teaching life) is back in session, I’m totally swamped. My days and nights are pretty full, and although I am getting into my routine, things still feel quite hectic.

I feel like I need a breather, so an artful pause, it is!

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Pine Cone by Alexis Arnold, Minted

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Aspens at Altitude by Kaleb and Marilyn Nimz, Minted

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Casa by Annie Montgomery, Minted

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Stepping Stones by Little Bird Paperie, Minted

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Shadow Shimmer by Design Lotus, Minted

Have a great weekend, everyone!

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Hotel to Home: The Palladian, Seattle, WA

I came across The Palladian on Apartment 34 and my jaw dropped. The hotel is stunning. I’ve never been to Seattle…hmm…

I wanted to recreate so many of the rooms, but since I’ve done quite a few bedrooms recently, I thought I’d move into the bathroom for today’s hotel to home post.

The Palladian, A Kimpton Hotel, Seattle. Designed by Nicole Hollis.

The Palladian, A Kimpton Hotel, Seattle. Designed by Nicole Hollis.

photo via Apartment 34

White-Cabana-inspired by Palladian

mirror, faucet, vanity, towels, sconce, soap, art, easel

I just love the addition of the old portrait artwork, don’t you? It’s sort of unexpected in a bathroom, isn’t it?

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Travel: 10 More Things To Do in Copenhagen

As Copenhagen is a city rich with history, art, design, and culture, it was hard to write a list of just 10 things to do in Copenhagen, so I’ve created another list. Here are 10 more things to do in Copenhagen.

1. Eat a Smorrebrod

Smorrebrod is an open-faced sandwich, and it’s one of the famous foods of Denmark. I only had one during my stay (at Paper Island), and it was delicious (but not ridiculously filling). I like the concept of the open-faced sandwich because its focus is on the toppings, in my opinion, and the bread is just a bonus.

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2. Rent a bicycle (if you dare)

Copenhagen is jam-packed full of bikes. I loved it. I wish we had more of a cycling culture here in Kitchener-Waterloo. I am not a die-hard cyclist, but I do like the convenience and affordability of commuter cycling. Copenhagen is well-designed for cycling because of it’s car-sized bike lanes.

Renting a bicycle is easy enough to do (learn more about bike rentals), and hotels may even have options for you (WakeUp Borgergade does). I didn’t end up renting a bicycle during my vacation, but if I return to Copenhagen, I will. .

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3. Illums Bolighus

If you’re looking for a crash course in Danish design, visit the Illums Bolighus department store on the pedestrian shopping street in the city centre. If you time your trip right, you can land in Copenhagen during summer sales (this is what happened to me…my credit card worked hard!).

While I wanted just about everything at Illums Bolighus, I only walked away with the Stelton vacuum jug (in white, naturally) and a few gifts (all made in Denmark!). (My Stelton made it back to Waterloo in one piece, but when I washed it, I dropped the glass jug and it shattered. It was a very sad moment! Stelton – and Amazon – sell replacements, so not all is lost.)

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Unfortunately, I didn’t take too many photos at Illums Bolighus, so this is all you get!

While you’re in the shopping mood, pop into Hay, too. The architecture is lovely and the products are beautiful (although much of what I saw was made in China).

Side note: If you spend over 300DKK in a store (approx. $70CAD), then you’ll be able to receive the tax back (the Value Added Tax/VAT) at the airport. Ask shop clerks for assistance. It’s a straightforward process and worth doing if you’re keen on getting some money back post-vacation.

4. Visit Nimb, and see the peacocks, too.

When I arrived at Tivoli Gardens, I first stopped in at Nimb because I was debating having a meal. I was more interested in food than the amusement park, if I’m being honest. I arrived at an off time though, and since I wasn’t hungry, I didn’t end up eating at Nimb (but I’ve read that it’s delicious). Once I saw the place, I was amazed by the dramatic architecture. The white building certainly makes an impression!

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Beyond the building, Nimb is a playground for peacocks. I couldn’t believe it. I loved them!

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5. Relax on a dock by the canal.

The weather was beautiful when I was in Copenhagen, and although I spent the majority of every day outside, I was walking around a lot, and I was eager to see all sorts of sights. When I spent time by the canal, lying on the dock, on the afternoon of my last day, I had wished that I had done it more often. It was so relaxing, and I liked watching the boats. I’d recommend grabbing a picnic lunch and a drink, and bringing it here. People were swimming, too, so give that a try, too!

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6. Climb the ramp in The Round Tower.

I had such a pleasant visit to The Round Tower first thing one morning. The round tower is a 7-storey tall tower with a hollow centre. The tower has a circular ramp from bottom to top (with only a few stairs at the very top to get to the lookout point). I loved the brick floor and the white walls.

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7. Sit at a café (and stay warm with a blanket)

I strongly encourage Waterloo cafés and restaurants to adopt Copenhagen’s have-a-blanket-on-every-chair approach. It makes for such a cozy outdoor dining experience during the cooler nights (or days). It’s a brilliant idea, and it works!

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8. Watch the highschool graduates celebrate.

Copenhagen, compared to Italy, is a very quiet and calm city. With the small(er) number of cars, there’s definitely less noise pollution than in other major cities I have been to. The people aren’t waving their arms around widly discussing politics and food (as far as I could tell) like they were in Italy. People barely even jay-walked (from my observations). That said, on June 24th, the city’s highschool graduates caused a fuss! It was highly amusing. I loved it.

The highschool graduates dawn personalized caps and walk around town wearing them during the last weekend of school. On that same weekend, they pile into open-topped trucks, blast music, honk horns, and have a moving dance party. It was awesome to watch, and the students were having a great time.

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(This is proof that not every Dane is tall and blonde.)

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Can anyone help with this translation? All I know is tak = thanks. (Google translate was of little help.)

9. Look at all the statues of women.

After a couple of weeks in Italy surrounded by statues of David, Dante, and others, I was surprised to see so many female statues in Copenhagen. I haven’t had a moment to read about the history of the city/country, or to Google all the statues that I came across, so if anyone has any insight on this, do tell.

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10. And here are even more places to see in Copenhagen (that I didn’t actually get to!)

Looking for more ideas? See my first list 10 things to do in Copenhagen.

All photos by Jordana.

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Travel: 10 Things to Do in Copenhagen

Well, dear readers, I’m now into my second week back from a wonderful European vacation, and I’m getting a handle on my photo organization.

Thanks to Expedia.ca, I was able to spend almost two glorious weeks in the chaotic, passionate, delicious, sunny, and inspiring Italy! (A full recap on Italy in the weeks ahead, I promise.) After Italy, though, I decided to extend my stay in Europe by a few days. As I always like a good travel adventure, I booked an EasyJet flight from Milano Malpensa to Copenhagen, Denmark! It was a brilliant decision if I do say so myself.

I have much to share from Italy, naturally, but this week, I’m sharing my take on  Copenhagen. I have loads to report – hello, Copenhagen, design, design, design – but for today, I thought I’d start things off with 10 things that I did in Copenhagen that I would recommend (or do again).

10 Things To Do in Copenhagen

1. Stay near Kongens Have park in WakeUp Copenhagen (Borgergade location).

Booking a Copenhagen hotel in June (for around $200/night) was nearly impossible. I needed 4 nights in a hotel, and it seemed like everything in my price range was absolutely full. Hotels in Copenhagen were more expensive than I was expecting, and when I was planning my holiday, I was getting a bit discouraged when it came to the hotels (and my budget).

I ended up booking a stay with WakeUp Borgergade, and I’m quite happy with how things worked out. The “budget” hotel (just under $200 night including breakfast) was bright, modern, and the staff were friendly at check-in. While my room was small, it was very well designed, efficient, bright, and clean. I cannot get over the design of the bathroom and the use of frosted glass. The bed was very comfortable, and the duvets were fluffy. The room’s large windows expanded the space, and, although the large window opened, I appreciated the air conditioning.

On the downside, since the room was small, there was barely any room to store luggage, unpack clothes, or spread out toiletries. I made do, of course, but a closet would have been useful…especially for an extended stay (and luggage full of 2 weeks worth of clothing).

What I hadn’t realized when I booked the hotel was the convenient location. It was just perfect! The WakeUp Borgergade is in a clean, high-end part of town and close to shopping streets, Kongens Have park and Rosenborg Castle (so so lovely!), restaurants, Nyhavn (harbour), and more. When I walked down to Tivoli on my third day and saw some of the hotels I was originally considering, I realized that I wouldn’t have been as happy with the locations of these places. I really enjoyed being within minutes of the park.

Another major plus of the WakeUp Bordergade was the breakfast. It was full of plenty of healthy options like eggs, cheese, meats, yogurt, muesli…as well as less healthy options (i.e., my top pick) like Nutella! I noticed at least four or five fresh bread options each morning which really impressed me. In general, I enjoy the convenience of hotel breakfast packages. I dislike searching for food before my morning coffee when I’m traveling to a new city.

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2. Design Museum Danmark

At the top of my “to see” list in Copenhagen was the Design Museum. Thankfully, I really enjoyed visiting the Design Museum Danmark. It’s a medium-sized museum which meant that I wasn’t there all day long. It was a great place to be first thing in the morning before the crowds arrived.

After my visit to the museum, I walked to the Nyhavn area on Bredgade. There are furniture and antique shops all along Bredgade which made for great window shopping.

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3. The Little Mermaid

This sweet mermaid is always ready for a photoshoot. I walked by The Little Mermaid early one morning, and the area was already full of tourists. She is over 100 years old! She sits pretty on the water, and she doesn’t complain about being stared at by tourists.

She’s a 4′ tall bronze sculpture by Edvard Eriksen based on The Little Mermaid fairytale by Hans Christian Andersen.

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4. The Amalienborg Palace

I loved the architecture of the four royal residence buildings. I watched the guards walk back and forth for a while…I was sort of mesmerized. That would not be a job for me, but I do wonder how many steps they get in per day. Do you think they reach the recommended 10K?

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5. Canal Tour

On the recommendation of a friend (thanks, Emmy!), I opted to take the Netto Badene canal tour. It cost 40DKK (about $9CAD) for about an hour tour. We saw a ton of things from the boat and learned a lot, too. Unfortunately, I don’t remember much about the history of what our tour guide told us. (Shame on me.) I do remember, however, going by the Royal Yacht. I didn’t see any royalty, but the crew was aboard working away!

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6. Paper Island

Paper island can be accessed by foot, but I opted to take public transportation in the form of a canal boat. Next time, I would probably want to rent a bike and take the long route around. Although, there is a pedestrian bridge that is due to be complete this summer, so you’d be on Paper Island from Nyhavn in just a few minutes.

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Go to Paper Island when you’re hungry because here’s where you can feast on diverse food. While many were going for burgers and Korean food, I opted for the traditional open-faced sandwich.

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After lunch, spend some time watching the world go by from a chair on the edge of Paper Island. When the sun is shining, this is a great place to be!

7. Street meat – hot dog with the works

Eating out in Copenhagen is expensive. Everything, really, is more expensive in Copenhagen than in Waterloo, if I’m honest. But the street meat stalls (hot dog stands) are reasonably priced and actually good. I’d definitely recommend picking up a dog-with-the-works. The stands are everywhere in the city (similar to the pretzel stands in Manhattan).

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8. Kongens Have

As I mentioned above, I really liked that my hotel was so close to Kongens Have park during my stay. It is beautifully maintained and manicured. Go for a morning walk or run around the park, so grab lunch to go and bring it here. It’s such a nice place to be.

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9. Tivoli

Tivoli Gardens is an amusement park in the city. This wasn’t on the top of my “to see” list, but I was so glad I made time for it on day 4. It was pretty magical and charming. I only walked around the park, but you could definitely buy tickets for rides, grab an ice cream, eat a meal, or a see a show.

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10. Norrebro

I read about Norrebro on the Design*Sponge Copenhagen City Guide, and I’m so glad I crossed the river to see it for myself. Norrebro has attitude, character, interest, and diversity. I liked it. The antique and design stores on Ravnsborggade and Elmegade were definitely highlights for me. Although I wasn’t hungry when I went to Norrebro, it looked like a great place to find more affordable meals.

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Stay tuned because later this week I’ll be sharing more from Copenhagen. As I discovered, there are definitely more than 10 things to do in this happy city!

All photos by Jordana.

p.s. Happy July 4th to all of my American readers!

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