Technology: Back in Action with the MacBook Air

My apologies for the surprise inconsistent posting on the blog last week. I experienced a bit of a blogging hiccup.

You see, my MacBook decided to quit on me last weekend after an unfortunate run-in with a few drops of coffee. Grr…

I researched the pros/cons of the various MacBook laptops for a week and finally opted for the Air. It’s been just a few days, but I’m already pleased with my purchase. The keyboard is very nice for typing, the screen is clear, and it’s so darn light. Yes, I know that this is one of its highly desirable features, but I didn’t really realize how great it was until now.

Here’s a snapshot of the unboxing:

White-Cabana-Macbook AirThe neatly organized package has my heart!

Pop Up! The Waterlogue App

Have you heard about the Waterlogue app? It turns any photograph into a watercolour-like image. I first learned about Waterlogue from one of my mom’s favourite blogs, The Enchanted Home. Before I spent the $2.99 on the app, I sent it to Corie and she downloaded it and tested it out for the both of us. Today she’s sharing some of the photos she took and Waterlogued this past weekend.

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Here’s the Plaza hotel.

Painted in Waterlogue

The dresses are from Anthropologie’s new bridal collection.

Painted in WaterloguePainted in WaterloguePainted in Waterlogue

Here’s Giselle – the boys put a pink duckie in her crib – they’re so excited to have a baby sister in the house!

Painted in Waterlogue

And here’s YOUR living room.

Painted in Waterlogue

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Are you sold? I am!

Photos & Waterlogue transformations by Corie.

*Corie stops by the blog every so often in her Pop Up! series. She hasn’t been on the blog for a while, but we forgive her because she’s been busy with her four sweet kids. The littlest arrived this summer! Corie, thanks for testing the Waterlogue app and sending these images my way! I always love seeing photos from NYC!

Design: Queen’s Human Media Lab

I am so happy to share the news of the Queen’s Human Media Lab designed by Karim Rashid because not only am I happy to shine the spotlight on Queen’s (I did my Master’s there) but I’ve been a fan of Karim Rashid for quite some time and I just love that he did his part to increase the hipness factor at Queen’s. The Human Media Lab’s sleek modern space offer a nice contrast to the traditional stone buildings that make up the majority of the buildings on campus.

office1

The Human Media Lab is located in Jackson Hall and the almost 2500 square feet space  includes a workspace, office, kitchen and corridor. The space is coming up to its one year anniversary in May. The space was designed by Karim Rashid and his team (including Camila Tariki, Evan McCollough, Kamala Hutauruk, and Juliette Hyunju Lee).

From my perspective (aka the perspective of a professional student), I love that the workspace includes a large meeting room for collaborative tasks, pods for individual work. The curved walls and windows are a stark contrast to the typically linear styles that are in traditional buildings.

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 windows at the Human Media Lab, Queen’s University

The Human Media Lab concept, Karim says, “is an open space with work stations that allow a flexible, interactive space where digital and physical can merge to shape and experiment and inspire. The design also allows the offices to close off to afford intense focused work”. Intense focused work – yes!

This space is so futuristic! There’s an interactive display with gesture technology. What does this mean? It means that people use in-air gestures to move objects around the wall-sized display screen. In addition, when people in adjoining cubicles are looking at each other, the translucent glass between them becomes transparent for communication. How does this happen? Two words: eye trackers. Cool!

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 Queen’s Human Media Lab, Kingston, Ontario

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The Workspace

kitchen

Kitchen

cubiclepod

Office

applemuseumThe Apple Collection

Photos courtesy of Jessica P. and Tre C. at Karim Rashid. Many thanks for your help.

 

3D sound

Happy new year everyone!

Just as I was thinking over the holidays, Yes, 3D printers would be great for creating vinyl records, TA-DA!

3D printed record by Amanda Ghassaei

Amanda Ghassaei has been tinkering with a 3D printer and created a method for converting digital audio files into printable 3D vinyl records. You can read more about her research and process via the link above.

Although the sound quality is not quite right yet, Amanda’s work is really good news for us audiophiles who have gone back to vinyl after a few detoured decades via cassette tapes and CDs. It’s about time I hear of a use for 3D printers that doesn’t feel bizarre!

What’s your take on 3D printing?

No more tears

My surprise at seeing the new washable Logitech keyboard advertisements is probably as what you’re thinking right now:

All clean after a thorough soaking

This photo of the Logitech washable keyboard freaks me out

Years of spill fears have kept my keyboards generally safe but for two spillcidents: the first with water, the second with tea, and in both cases the laptop survived and the keys (and data) were fine. When it’s a laptop, the worst part of the exercise its abrupt suspended use over two days of stressful upside down drying, hoping that everything will be okay and strategizing on what to do if all is lost.

This one’s an external keyboard, so it won’t prevent anyone from ruining a laptop.

The Logitech keyboard not only resists the occasional spill but it welcomes a full-on soaking to clean out all the dirt and whatnot that might have lodged itself within. I think it’s a great idea for a keyboard that is visited by many hands during the day – especially post-bake sale sticky fingers.

Does anyone take lunch breaks anymore? This keyboard seems like a great idea to keep the keys from telling the story of donuts with sprinkles.

Available at Amazon.