Design: Visual Comfort Lighting at HPMKT

I’m back today with another update from my first High Point Market experience. I already shared my overall impression of HPMKT and my prediction of trends, but today I’m sharing a close-up look at one company in particular that really came to impress!

As soon as I stepped into the Visual Comfort & Co. showroom, I was pretty much speechless. The staff was extremely welcoming and informative, and I instantly learned so much about Visual Comfort’s place in the lighting industry and its many designer partnerships. Based in Houston, Texas, Visual Comfort manufactures lighting for the likes of Thomas O’Brien, Kelly Wearstler, Aerin Lauder, Alexa Hampton, and Suzanne Kasler (impressive list, right? See the full list of designers here.).

Visual-Comfort-White-Cabana-HPMKT-1Visual Comfort & Co. showroom entrance at High Point Market

Here’s some of what caught my eye (warning, beautiful forms lie ahead):

Visual-Comfort-White-Cabana-HPMKT-2E.F. Chapman

White-Cabana-Visual-Comfort-EF-ChapmanE. F. Chapman

Visual-Comfort-White-Cabana-HPMKT-6Thomas O’Brien

Visual-Comfort-White-Cabana-HPMKT-4Kate Spade

Visual-Comfort-White-Cabana-HPMKT-3Kate Spade

Visual-Comfort-White-Cabana-HPMKT-7Aerin Lauder

Visual-Comfort-White-Cabana-HPMKT-5Aerin Lauder

Visual-Comfort-White-Cabana-HPMKT-8Suzanne Kasler

Gorgeous, right? Every piece was even more beautiful in person if you can believe it. The showroom sparkled!

And…for your entertainment…here’s how I spent much of my time at Visual Comfort:

White-Cabana-HPMKT-1Action shot! Thanks, Corie, for snapping this one.

Come back tomorrow as I’ll be sharing my design-star-struck moment.

Photos by Jordana.

Uptown: Lighting around the House

It’s a civic holiday today, which means I get to spend an extra day at home doing projects, seeing friends, and exploring Waterloo. Happy Monday to you all!

Way back in the fall, I¬†wrote about Venini lighting. I also shared the fact that I had¬†acrylic versions throughout my house, and that I had wanted to get rid of them right away.¬†I have a massive one in my foyer that I hated, but once I painted the walls white, the light fixture completely grew on me. That one light (and the matching versions¬†in the hallways) started a domino effect in terms of the lighting for my home. Let’s take a tour, shall we?

The foyer chandelier came with the house. It is big, and it has a gazillion light bulbs.

venini-1

All the hallway lighting came with my house as well. I have a few of these smaller versions, and they take a few lightbulbs each.

venini-5

I knew I wanted to replace the dining room chandelier and my bedroom fan, so when my mom and I found this amazing chandelier at the Habitat ReStore, I grabbed it. I love the little balls on this version, and it ties in nicely with the hallway lighting.

venini-4

In my bedroom, I have two smaller versions¬†to match my dining room chandelier. These ones are my favourites. They’re sweet, little, and a little less 80s glam than the others.

venini-2 venini-3

Do I want to invest in the crystal version of these? Maybe one day if I find them on super sale.

Uptown: The Tronchi Lighting

When I bought my house I thought one of the first things to go would be the hall light fixtures. They looked, to me at least, to be too flashy and I couldn’t really imagine how they would match my furniture. The dark burgundy walls didn’t help their case.

White-Cabana-light

before: the foyer with dark walls and a fancy chandelier

Once I painted the place white, the chandeliers seemed to (almost) disappear. They looked less gawdy than before and they actually began to grow on me. In fact, I’ve become such a fan of them over the last few months that I have now decided to keep them.

And I don’t seem to be alone in my interest in this style of chandelier.

DSC_20812

From the Right Bank

7

47 Park Avenue

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via Ebay

The chandeliers in the above photos are the¬†tronchi style. They’re made of crystal and each piece is in the shape of a tube or trunk (hence the Italian translation of the name). These handmade Murano glass Venini chandeliers can also be made up of prism crystals and balls like the gorgeous fixture from 1st Dibs below.

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chandelier05_l

via 1st Dibs

A couple of weeks ago, I found a few similar chandeliers and decided to scoop them up for¬†other places around the house. I’m completely hooked on these now and I have completely embraced their fascinating style! I should say, though, that¬†my collection of lighting fixtures is made up of the budget/imitation version of the Venini glass chandeliers but they still reflect the light beautifully and are interesting to look at (not to mention great conversation pieces). The lucite prisms in my chandelier collection are proving that they work perfectly with my decor. I’ve dropped a few of the prisms as I cleaned them so I’m pretty thankful that the pieces are durable. They’re fairly lightweight too which has made installation smooth. Be on the lookout, people. I have no doubt that we’ll be seeing more of these Venini chandeliers (or the lucite versions) all over the design blogs and magazines soon enough.

Check back soon for a full lighting reveal!